Archive for the ‘Family Tree’ Category

How to start your family tree, using Findmypast

March 8, 2015

Interested in starting your own family tree? I’ve put together this video guide to show you how to get going.

You can use the birth, marriage, death and census records I mention in the video by signing up for Findmypast’s 14 day free trial.

You’ll need to enter payment details, but just cancel the day before the expiry date through the ‘My Account’ section of the website and you won’t be charged.

 

 

I’ve been tracing my own family history for about six years – my paternal Silk ancestors feature in the video. I really hope you find it useful.

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Beginning the Howard hunt

September 30, 2011

A little while ago I discovered that my maternal great-great-grandmother Mercy had the same maiden name as her married name: Howard. This made me wonder whether Mercy Howard may have been related to her husband (my great-great-grandfather) Ernest Howard. I’ve been doing a bit of digging and I’m becoming more and more convinced that they were.

Ernest’s Howard line

I’ve been researching Ernest and Mercy’s families using the 1841 – 1901 censuses and have managed to trace Ernest’s Howard line all the way back to the 1841 census. Here are a couple of highlights to show you what I’ve discovered:

Ernest Howard and family in the 1871 census - please click to enlarge

The 1871 census shows Ernest living with his parents, Elijah and Marion Howard (my great-great-great-grandparents). Elijah was a Labourer and Marion a Straw Plaiter. Both had been born in Hitchin, Hertfordshire.

Elijah Howard and family in the 1851 census - please click to enlarge

The 1851 census records Elijah Howard living with his parents, James and Ann Howard (my great-great-great-great-grandparents – phew!). James was a Chimney Sweep and Ann was a Plaiter. Both had been born in Hitchin, Hertfordshire.

Mercy’s Howard line

I haven’t done as well with Mercy’s line, unfortunately. I’ve only managed to trace the family back to the 1871 census and have got stuck here for the moment. I’ve discovered something that has made me more convinced that Mercy was related to her husband, though:

Mercy Howard and family in the 1871 census - please click to enlarge

The 1871 census records Mercy living with her parents Richard and Sophia Howard (my great-great-great-grandparents). Sophia was from Campton in Hertfordshire, but Richard had been born in Hitchin and was a Master Sweep.

This has shown me that both Mercy’s Howard family and Ernest’s Howard family came from Hitchin and that both were employed in the Chimney Sweeping trade.

Next steps

I’ve added all of my discoveries to my family tree, but will I ever be able to join up the two Howard lines? To help get Mercy’s side back a bit further, I’ve just ordered a copy of Richard and Sophia Howard’s marriage certificate – I’ll let you know what that tells me when it arrives!

The Howard branch of my family tree

Researching the Howard family

October 29, 2010

A couple of posts ago, I found my great-grandmother Ada Howard and her parents in the 1911 census. I thought I’d return to this particular line of my family history and concentrate on tracking it back a bit further.

Ada was seven in the 1911 census, suggesting that she was born in around 1903/1904. The census form also states that my great-grandmother was born in Buntingford, Hertfordshire. By searching the birth indexes at findmypast.co.uk, I found the following entry for an Ada Maria Howard born in Royston in 1903.

Ada Maria Howard's birth record

 

I gave Royston a quick google and it seems it’s only about eight miles away from Buntingford. It therefore looked likely that this was the record of my great-grandmother’s birth, so I used the reference details provided to order Ada’s birth certificate from the General Register Office.

Ada Maria Howard's birth certificate

 

The birth certificate tells me that Ada was born on 11th June 1903 in Layston, Buntingford. It informs me that her father, Ernest Howard, was a Chimney Sweeper Master and that her mother’s name was Mercy. Interestingly, Mercy’s maiden name was Howard – perhaps a sign that my great-great-grandparents were cousins?

I’ve updated the Howard side of my family tree with the details I’ve gleaned from both the 1911 census and Ada’s birth certificate. I think I’ll continue tracing this particular branch of my family tree for the time being – I’d love to find out a bit more about Ernest’s occupation and also whether there really was a bit of inter-family marriage in the Howard line.

The Howard branch of my family tree

Trace your family tree in 10 steps

July 23, 2010

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been working on a project to show family history newbies exactly how you can start researching your family tree with findmypast.co.uk. I’ve used an example from my own ancestry – my paternal Silk line – and have actually managed to trace my tree back to about 1794 using these 10 steps.

To take a look at my progress, simply click on the image below and a powerpoint presentation will start downloading.

If you then select ‘notes page’ in the ‘view’ section of the tool bar at the top of the screen, you’ll be able to see my notes along with the images on the presentation itself. Alternatively, if you wanted to print the presentation, simply select ‘notes pages’ in the drop down box under ‘print what’ and it will print both my notes and the images.

I hope you find it interesting – let me know what you think!

Marriage certificates explained

January 21, 2010

The marriage certificates I ordered from the General Register Office have provided me with lots of juicy new information about my great-grandparents. Below you’ll find a quick overview of the details that marriage certificates can give you.

Please click to enlarge

Please click to enlarge

I’ve added this new information to my family tree, extending it back a generation to include my four newly discovered great-great-grandfathers. I really feel like I’m making some progress! Now that I have an idea of my great-grandparents’ ages at marriage, I can have a root around for the records of their births in the BMD indexes. In addition, because all four seem to have been born before 1911 and because I now know their fathers’ names and occupations, I could attempt to search for my ancestors in the recently released 1911 census – currently the closest census to the modern day available.

Aside from this, I’d really like to find out a bit more about what my great-grandparents’ and great-great-grandfathers’ occupations entailed. In particular, I’d love to find out more about Jack Cooke’s employment as a Chauffeur, Ada Howard’s life as a Domestic Servant and what her father’s day would have been like working as a Chimney Sweep. If anyone has any suggestions as to how I might be able to find out a little more, please do point me in the right direction.

‘Begin with what you know’

August 10, 2009

If there’s one thing I’ve picked up while working at findmypast, it’s definitely this tip! Honestly, ask absolutely anybody involved in genealogy and they’ll all tell you the same thing, “start with what you know”. It’s very easy to try to run before you can walk when starting family history research (particularly if you have any juicy family rumours doing the rounds!) but the advice I’ve been given has been very clear; don’t try to work forwards from a rumoured famous ancestor, always work backwards from yourself.

So, what exactly do I know? While I’d love to pretend that this blog’s bound to unearth all sorts of illustrious relatives, the truth is that I know very little about my ancestors and, sadly, am yet to hear any rumours of blue blood! What I do know are the names and some birth, marriage and death dates of the family members I’ve grown up with (and have needed to buy birthday presents for!). These include my parents, paternal grandparents and great-grandparents, though my memory of birthdays, marriages and maiden names gets progressively hazier the further back I try to remember.

I don’t really know anything about my mum’s family aside from my maternal grandparents’ names so will need to speak to her to gather further information about them. Likewise, the next step I’ll take to trace my paternal family is to speak to my nan. She should be able to tell me about the family she grew up with, plus fill in the blanks in my own memory. I suspect that she may also have a few photos and birth, marriage and death certificates lurking around – if I flutter my eyelashes, I’m sure she’d let me take copies of them.

In the meantime, I’ve set up a couple of family trees online to help keep track of the information I’m starting to gather – I can just imagine how confused I’m going to get if I don’t keep everything together! I’ve set myself up with one using findmypast’s family tree software, family tree explorer, and have also registered with Genes Reunited.

Starting my family tree using family tree explorer

Starting my family tree with family tree explorer